Hamtc Labor Agreement

This treaty change will be particularly disruptive, as the Hanford Atomic Metal Trades Council`s employment contract expires on Nov. 19, said Jeff McDaniel, president of HAMTC. HAMTC is an umbrella organisation for 15 Hanford unions. Significant infrastructure still needs to be installed to prepare the waste for treatment and bring it to the glazing plant, and any disruption to the workforce will make it more difficult to meet legal deadlines for starting waste treatment, union officials said. The goal was for site cleanup workers to be covered by an agreement, either when the DOE brings in new contractors or renegotiate its agreements with existing suppliers next year, said Pete Gomez, president of Local Unit 12-369. The existing employment contract would have expired in November 2019. HAMTC asked the DOE for a one-year extension of the employment contract, but without success, McDaniel said. Gomez said the unions had three main goals for the one-year extension: a general wage increase, a language of succession and not a structural change in benefits. Succession is important because it ensures that any new contractor who can take over the rehabilitation project must accept the provisions of the employment contract and recognize the union. The Hanford Atomic Metal Trades Council (“HAMTC”) is appealing the District Court`s summary judgment to Rockwell International Corporation (“Rockwell”). Hamtc argues that the District Court wrongly introduced the doctrine of judicial estoppels, sua sponte, in order to refrain from HAMTC`s counterclaim on order to resolve a complaint filed under a collective agreement. We turn around and go back to the district court to check if the complaint is arbitration. Workers have yet to approve the extension, but no date was set for a vote when HAMTC announced the tentative deal on social media on Monday afternoon.

Since 1977, HAMTC and Rockwell have been parties to a collective agreement. In 1982, Rockwell and HAMTC officials began negotiations for the creation of a new classification of workers to decontaminate and decommission (“D D”) certain facilities. The new category of work was drawn from a request from the Department of Energy for D D at a lower cost than the maintenance of the facilities. The classification and definition of occupation D D was taken over by HAMTC and Rockwell and became part of the existing collective agreement (AMC) on December 14, 1982. As part of the agreement, D D`s work was awarded to the local I-369 of the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers Union (OCAW). A new KNA, negotiated in 1983, contained the D-D classification. . . .