Usda Organic Equivalency Agreements

Since June 1, 2012, certified organic products can be moved freely between the United States and the EU. Read the OTA press release for more information on how the US and EU will work together to promote strong organic programs, protect organic standards, improve cooperation, and facilitate trade in organic products. The United States has an equivalence agreement with the European Union (EU). This means that, as long as the terms of the agreement are met, organic farms certified to USDA organic or organic standards can be labeled and sold in both countries as organic farms. Both cfia and USDA have their own standards and rules defining organic production and market requirements. Under the equivalency agreement, CFIA recognizes imported organic food, livestock, and plants produced in accordance with U.S. organic standards by USDA-accredited certification bodies under the NOP. or when final processing or packaging takes place in the United States During their negotiations on ecological equivalence and in consultation with their national stakeholders, the USDA and CFIA found that certain technical differences between the two standards should be maintained by the importing country. To be considered “equivalent” under this trade agreement, organic products traded between the United States and Canada must meet the following additional requirements. “Agricultural products manufactured using sodium nitrate may not be sold or marketed in Canada as eco-organic.” Organic products considered equivalent under the agreement may use one or both interchangeable organic labels available from certifiers. It should be taken into account that products sold on a given market must comply with national labelling requirements (e.g. B language requirements, clear nutrition labelling and different product qualities), including those covered by organic legislation. Note that Canada and the United States have slightly different approaches to organic labelling, such as: Canada does not allow the indication “100% organic”; The U.S.

“Made with” indication for products containing 70-95% organic ingredients is considered a percentage in Canada (products must say “organic ingredients XX%). For complete labelling guidance, please follow the requirements set out in the following official guides and resources: for organic exporters to Canada, everything changed on June 30, 2009 with the coming into force of Canada`s new organizational regime (COR). In the absence of an agreement, USDA certified organic foods exported to Canada would have had to obtain a second certification in order to bring them into compliance with binding Canadian standards and regulations. Similarly, according to Canadian guidelines exported to the U.S., all certified organic foods should have continued to meet National Organic Program (NOP) guidelines before being sold in the U.S. market. . . .